Taking the Next Steps

Do you have a dream you would like to bring into the world?  Do you have an idea you want to make real?

Recently I was asked to speak and demonstrate coaching at an International Processwork Online Community meeting.  I was delighted to coach Catharine MacDonald on her vision: to support IT sector organisations benefit from the distinct talents of individuals on the Asberger’s or Autism spectrum.

Catharine vision *** In fact the unique capabilities of neurodiverse employees have been

I bet your own aspirations are equally as compelling.

https://hbr.org/2017/12/why-the-australian-defence-organization-is-recruiting-cyber-analysts-on-the-autism-spectrum

Coaching The Gap

I want to thank Catharine for permission to share her story.  Her commitment to working with those whose capability is often overlooked, mirrors our own commitment to championing diversity. Her work is part of a growing social movement to recognise and respect the differences that make us unique.

Catharine was so close to achieving her vision. All of the ingredients essential to her success were there. With years of hands on experience as an IT manager, Catharine understands that these employees can be star designers and developers – when managers create the conditions for their success. And she knows first hand how to create those conditions.

Whatsmore her entry into this arena as a coach seemed perfectly timed. Immediately after coaching Catharine I read a Harvard Business Review article outlining programs run by the Australian Defence Force to recruit neurodiverse cyber analysts. She was onto a real market need.

At times our visions can be both close to the surface and tantalizingly elusive.  That’s where coaching comes in.  We coach the gap.  We look for what’s almost but not quite happening, and build the insight and action needed to achieve results.

The transition Catharine was making was moving from people manager to coach and consultant. She was in a role transition. Typically people in role transitions, need support to assess the market, recognise who their audience is, and tweak their strategy. This builds grounded confidence and creates a sense of momentum.

Despite and perhaps because of her extensive experience in this field, she searched for the right words to describe what she offered – from the perspective of a potential client.

Translating your skills into a new context can feel like a challenge.  To really believe in your own capability, to back your ideas and go for it, can seem impossible from our usual vantage point.  Others often see our ability more than we do …. just as Catharine saw the important role those on the autism spectrum might play.

Sometimes this means working with others who hold an important piece of the puzzle or who can hold the mirror for you. It means approaching others for support.

In truth only a little tweaking was needed for Catharine to reach out and take the next steps. While they may seem small, minor adjustments can make all the difference between frustration and success.

Here at GCI, we have a passion for helping therapists, entrepreneurs, leaders, facilitators and social activists draw on their skills and experience and take the next steps to make their dreams a reality. If you’d like to enter the coaching arena or develop a niche practice, please feel free to book a complimentary conversation with us.

Thanks to Catharine, for connecting us with – and for your commitment to diversity. We love your mission!!!

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